Comparison of learning theories

Personality theories and models - introduction Behavioural and personality models are widely used in organisations, especially in psychometrics and psychometric testing personality assessments and tests. Behavioural and personality models have also been used by philosophers, leaders and managers for hundreds and in some cases thousands of years as an aid to understanding, explaining, and managing communications and relationships. Used appropriately, psychometrics and personality tests can be hugely beneficial in improving knowledge of self and other people - motivations, strengths, weaknesses, preferred thinking and working styles, and also strengths and preferred styles for communications, learning, management, being managed, and team-working.

Comparison of learning theories

Multiple Intelligences Howard Gardner of Harvard has identified seven distinct intelligences. This theory has emerged from recent cognitive research and "documents the extent to which students possess different kinds of minds and therefore learn, remember, perform, and understand in different ways," according to Gardner According to this theory, "we are all able to know the world through language, logical-mathematical analysis, spatial representation, musical thinking, the use of the body to solve problems or to make things, an understanding of other individuals, and an understanding of ourselves.

Comparison of learning theories

Where individuals differ is in the strength of these intelligences - the so-called profile of intelligences -and in the ways in which such intelligences are invoked and combined to carry out different tasks, solve diverse problems, and progress in various domains.

Indeed, as currently constituted, our educational system is heavily biased toward linguistic modes of instruction and assessment and, to a somewhat lesser degree, toward logical-quantitative modes as well.

Comparison of Learning Theories Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

Students learn in ways that are identifiably distinctive. The broad spectrum of students - and perhaps the society as a whole - would be better served if disciplines could be presented in a numbers of ways and learning could be assessed through a variety of means.

Visual-Spatial - think in terms of physical space, as do architects and sailors. Very aware of their environments. They like to draw, do jigsaw puzzles, read maps, daydream.

They can be taught through drawings, verbal and physical imagery. Bodily-kinesthetic - use the body effectively, like a dancer or a surgeon.

Keen sense of body awareness. They like movement, making things, touching. They communicate well through body language and be taught through physical activity, hands-on learning, acting out, role playing.

Tools include equipment and real objects. Musical - show sensitivity to rhythm and sound. They love music, but they are also sensitive to sounds in their environments.

They may study better with music in the background. They can be taught by turning lessons into lyrics, speaking rhythmically, tapping out time. Interpersonal - understanding, interacting with others. These students learn through interaction.

They have many friends, empathy for others, street smarts. They can be taught through group activities, seminars, dialogues. Tools include the telephone, audio conferencing, time and attention from the instructor, video conferencing, writing, computer conferencing, E-mail.Comparison of different learning theories The focus of ETEC is the theory behind learning.

We’ve spent the past 12 weeks looking at different learning theories, and discussing how these learning theories are applicable to our students and our lives. Comparing Learning Theories ~ Behaviorism, Cognitivism, Constructivism & Humanistic Learning Theories Comparison Among Behaviorism Cognitivism L.

Theories List of Key B.F. Skinner Jean Piaget Theorists Ivan Pavlov Robert Gagne Edward Thorndike Lev Vygotsky John B. Watson Role of · Learners are basically · Learners process, store & retrieve Learners passive, just responding information for .

Details of both theories illuminate the differences and connections between the behavioral and constructivist theories in relationship to how children learn and how their behavior is affected.

How curriculum and instruction work with these theories to promote learning and how educators view learning with respect to both theories are also reviewed.

Learning theories can give us some consistent ways of looking at classroom practice and some rational explanations for what occurs. For teachers, theory can provide guidance when it comes to decision making about school curriculum and teaching strategies.

The major theme of Vygotsky’s theoretical framework is that social interaction plays a fundamental role in the development of cognition. Vygotsky () states: “Every function in the child’s cultural development appears twice: first, on the social level, and later, on the individual level.

There are three main categories of learning theories, behaviourism, cognitivism, and constructivism. Behaviourism is concerned with observable behaviour; it classified learning as acquiring new behaviour based on environment.

Teaching and Learning Resources / Instructional Approaches